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Author Topic: How long does it take to have a calmer eski  (Read 22110 times)
Saint Mom
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« on: October 22, 2003, 01:33:36 PM »

Good day,
I have a female miniature Eskie.  She is now 13 months old and I adopted her when she was 9 months from a single mom with a 6 year old daughter.  I was of course told that the dog was no problem and the reason they were sending her away was only because it was time-consuming (and they had no time) and it wasn't fair to the dog being caged most of the time.  Surprise!!!! She was in no way what we were told and can't return her as we are now in love with this beauty!

For those of you who have Eskies, how long did it take to have a calmer dog?  I have been told by my trainer that she is in her teen phase and it should last for about another year before we can expect efficient results.

This cutie has been with us for 4 months and s driving us nuts most of the time.  I also work with a trainer and he says she should be easy to teach from results he gets (amazing we can't seem to reproduce the same results at home when trainer is gone).

My major concern is that she has way toooo much energy (we keep her busy a lot - exercice, playing, etc) and it still does not seem enough.  We try the down/stay technic to calm her down.  But anything and everything catches her attention and she flies again....  We end up yelling at her (we know it is not right - but she pushes us to the limit - we try working with positive reinforcement) to stay down.

She also chases after my two older cats (3 & 11 years old). We had a 3 year old cat that died at the vet for no reason that they could think of (but probably of stress - at home and at the vet prior to a minor surgery).  We have a 5 month old kitten and they are both doing fine and enjoy the playing although I still need to watch my dog as she loves to rough-play.

This morning she (again) did some mischiefs (wripped newspaper, ate wallet and money in it :-))) and we just about ready to give her up (altough we know deep down inside we are going to keep her home!!!) as it is very hard.

Encouragement at this point will help us make it through this teenager stage.....

Thank you.

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Kathy
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« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2003, 02:26:25 PM »

Ah yes!  The teenage years.  My two Eskies are deep into them.  The attention span of a gnat, constant testing to see if the old rules still apply, endless energy.  Their brain flies out of their head at the sight of anything moving.

But you can survive this.  Here are few suggestions that work for me.

Be consistent with the training.  Really short sessions, like three to five minutes max, several times a day.  Run through whatever behaviors you are working on--sit, down, stay, come, etc.  Don't forget to teach some new ones--shake, wave, kiss.  Teen dogs need to learn to use their brain, too, and this is good mental work for them (and tires them out!)

Manage their environment.  At my house no wallets get chewed because they are never put where Eskies can get them.  Same with shoes, socks, goodies on the counter, whatever might interest doggies.  I trained a good "Leave it" behavior so they will drop something if I make a mistake and leave it where they can get it.

Give your Eskie something to do.  Mine have lots of chew toys, stuffed toys (Kola likes to make things squeak) etc.  Sometimes I give them a paper bag and let them rip away.  Empty TP rolls are also good for some shredding action.  I watch to make sure they don't eat too much of it.  Your Eskie needs some mental exercise, too.  Don't just give her a biscuit.  Wrap it in a paper bag and stuff it in a cardboard box and have her work to get it out.  You might have to help her in the beginning but she will soon be doing it alone.  Get a Kong and stuff it with various goodies that she has to work to get out. (Plain unsweetened vanilla yogurt frozen inside works great.) Buster Cubes and Molecule Balls are other toys that require the dog to work to get the treats out.

Every time your Eskie chews the wrong thing, redirect her to an acceptable chewie.  Mine now ignore newspapers and other things on the floor (except anything I've worn!) and go to their toybox to get a bone or other chewie.

I like your positive reinforcement method.  Don't forget to reinforce simple things like snoozing on the floor, chewing the right thing, NOT chasing the cat, four paws on the floor in the kitchen, etc.  Don't take these behaviors for granted, but reward them so they will be repeated.  Dogs do what works to get them what they want.

You WILL get through this with a lot of patience, management, and consistency.  Just like a human teenager!
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Saint Mom
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« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2003, 03:21:57 PM »

Thanks Kathy for your prompt reply.  I will sure try some of your tricks as of tonight.  How long have you had your babies and how old were they?  Since I adopted mine at 9 months, I feel that I might have missed on some important training that could have been done earlier to prevent correction later on. But the reality is that I have to work with what I was given.  A nice cute fur ball!

We have started this week a more "serious" training program as we need to reinforce our leadership but it is not easy.  She is very dominant and replies (barks) back at us and runs around until we finally get a hold on her and make her down/stay.  Even with the leash in the house she is a hard one to catch :-)))  she is constantly testing the limits.

Of course, she prefers everything else more than her $100+ worth of toys, ropes, bones, kong, etc (ie. newspapers, socks, wallet - blame the husband!!!, etc). Go figure!!! But once she is concentrating on her Kong or other chewing toys we are ok for a 15-30 minute break.  That is until a cat thinks that the dog is away and comes down from the bedrooms.  Then the merry-go-round begins again.

She was crate trained (at least 18-hours days - before we adopted her) and we started about 5 weeks ago to let her gradually loose in my kichten/dining area when we are not home or when we sleep at night (I need to divide my time with my 3 cats too).  We try to limit what she can get her paws/teeth on but it seems we are never fast enough for her.  We found out this morning that she was able to climb on the dining room table by pushing away a chair to make room for her little body to swivel in between.  She was doing fine the first 3 weeks but had a fall back this week (chewed twice my dining room table, placemat eaten).  In order to prevent it from doing more chewing other than her toys, I have sprayed some tobasco sauce on baseboards and table.  We will see the outcome.  But for 3 days this week - Tues, Wed and Thurs. the trainer said to put her back in her crate in the kitchen during the day.  She is suffering anxiety separation and it should teach her that nothing bad is going to happen to her during the day when no one is home.

I just forget how terrible we were as teenagers.  Play - although trainers say dogs don't play -  is surely their top priorities!!!  And am I ever learning what the word patience means lately. :-))))

We had a X-collie before her for 15 years and really forgot how devil they can be sometimes.... although this one beats any other dog I have know so far!!!

Again thanks for your support and we will keep hanging on and go back to our trainer for refreshment course!
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eskieagilitygal
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« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2003, 06:42:03 PM »

Hang in there Nuuk... Things will get better, just keep up with the training.   Kathy had some great suggestions and the only thing I could add, which will also benefit you and the family is go for nice long walks daily.   I walk Winston 2 - 3 miles daily and that seemed to help.  I first walked him (early in the morning), prior to leaving for work... that seemed to help with the seperation issue, as you are spending some quality time, prior to hitting the road for work.  We tend to get up, shower and go, which in the dog eyes, seems like we are jetting out and away.   If you don't want to walk that early in the a.m., try a 15 min.  to 30 min. play session, prior to leaving for work.  After awhile, you'll find you can shorten the time or just do it everyother day or so.  Though it helped me greatly and got me to work with a better attitude.    

I also have a cat (12 years old)... which Winston decided was a toy.. he use to grab him by the head and drag him across the living room...after a few good bats by the cat and a couple bloody noses, Winston soon stopped.  Cats can normally take care of their own relationship issues.  They now sleep together and groom each other.

Again Good Luck!
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« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2003, 08:06:19 PM »

I have to agree with everything that was said before but I would like to add that Eskies love to be chased.  It's a game for them so if you are chasing after her when she gets something or does something wrong she has more fun when you chase her.  Maybe that's why she keeps doing some of the things because she is getting your attention and loving the play time.  What you should do is teach her the leave it command that Kathy mentioned.  The way to do this is to put her in a sit/stay.  Put one treat in your left hand and another in your right.  Hold your left hand up to you chest and put your right hand by her mouth.  When she goes for the treat close your hand fast before she can get it and say leave it.  Eventually she will get the idea and when she ignores the treat in your right hand when you say leave it by looking away etc.  give her the treat in your left.  Very important that you never give her the one in your right hand.   This way when she gets something you don't want her to have you say leave it and she'll know what you want.  I hope this was helpful.  Also try to ignore her when she runs away from you when she has something.  They hate to be ignored.  Of course if she is chewing something that you value or could hurt her then of course you have to try to get it from her.  Try to ignore her first she just might lose interest in what she has.  Good Luck and keep us posted.  My Lola is 17 months and she seems to be calming down now so you have hope.  Wink
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« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2003, 10:29:06 PM »

Thanks for your replies.

Anything that worked for you will sure be useful for me to try at this point.  Combination of tricks from trainer (who by the way never trained an Eskie before but has good reputation) and  owners who understand the dog's character are going to make the life in this household a whole lot more enjoyable.

It's true that in the morning we tend to get up way toooo late and run out of the house.  

As we get up at 4:45am, which is too early for a walk, I will try tomorrow morning to keep a good 15 minutes just to play games with her.  I will make sure that her Kong is fully stuffed before leaving.  

We always jog/walk daily after work and do some mountain hiking or in-line skating on weekends whenever possible.

Weekends (starting Thursday night til Monday morning)  are also pretty intensed for her as we go to family and friends that have all kids (we don't) or other dogs and she has a lot of fun and dead-tired by end of day on these days.  So of course I just realized now that maybe when Monday morning comes it could be too hard for her to handle (being alone) and may suffer from anxiety.  We probably will try avoiding loaded weekends for a while until she gets used to being in a quieter environment.

All in all she isn't that bad but she is left alone 4 days per week for 9.5 hours in a row when we are at work.  The rest of the time she spends with us and we take her everywhere dogs are allowed.  In the car, not a noise nor destructive behaviour.  So far, she stayed in the car for a max. of 1.5 hour and nothing happened (crossed my fingers) (and she does not see us).

Tonight we practiced the sit/down/stay command and it worked wonderfully for an hour while she was eating her Kong and Nylabone.  She still tried to climb on the sofa but after 4 "no"s she finally understood that she had to stay on her dog cushion.  So far so good..... one of my rare evening without too many reprimands....  And to top it off, she almost did not bark during the entire evening.  But let's keep dreaming as we know that things are going to improve and we know that some days will be harder than others!!

Well it is bedtime now and I will let you know on Monday how the next few days were and if training sessions are improving (no reason not).

Take care!
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« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2003, 11:29:57 PM »

I too have a teenager, Chloe is 18 months and has started also acting up.  We fenced in our backyard, so she can run around like a nut with the kids.  She has taken over their soccer ball and play with it constantly.  Constant training has helped and so has the increase in exercise activity.  Not only do I wear her out in the backyard and 9yr and 4yr get pretty tired too.  I thought we were hitting smooth sailing at 1 yr., but she really started acting up within the last 2 1/2 months.   I met another owner in the park with a 3yr old eskie, she mentioned that at 2yrs., they really start calming down.  Does it make a difference in size?  Chloe is a mini, so would she be more of a handful than a standard?  We also could never part with our baby.  I told my husband, we survived the terrible two's in the kids, we can survive Chloe's teen angst.

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« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2003, 11:58:06 PM »

Hey Nuuk...Where do you find the in-line skates for mini eskie paws?    LOL!   Had to do it!  Just having fun!  Brought up some cute images in my mind!
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« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2003, 05:05:18 PM »

If I read correctly I think you said you are gone for 9.5 hours for 4 days a week. That is a lot for an active eskie to be alone. I am in no way criticizing, I mean we have to earn a living! but in terms of the dog that is part of the problem. She sounds like a great candidate for doggy day care if that is possible for your family. If not, could you get someone to come in daily for a walk.

Not to discourage you but my eskie did not settle down until she was 5. On the plus side, I got to be a great runner and know all the jogging trails in town. We ran through rain, snow, sun, sleet, and more rain and did I mention rain!
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« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2003, 09:09:37 AM »

Here is an update on my little one.

I went back to the trainer 2 weeks ago.  He put her on homeopathic treatment to calm down her anxiety and my vet agrees with this treatment.  I had my doubt about this but it seems to work.  We've had a few of days where she just stayed quiet in the living room chewing/playing with her toys.  Something we've never seen before.  We'll keep her on this another 2 weeks and see the real outcome.  

Being calmer will give her a chance to see that nothing bad is going to happen to her.  For the trainer he said that because she is trying to earn her rank in the house she is always jolting on "220 volts" and doing everything to get attention (whether bad or good as long as she gets attention).

I also talked to him (and my vet who disagrees too) about a day care for her and his answer was a big no-no for various reasons he explained to us which made sense.  He's been training dogs for 30 years and according to him it would not solve the problem but put a plaster on it. We need to show her who the alpha is and what the rules are in the house.

I told him as well that I was concerned with leaving her for long periods of time 4 days per week max. (yes we have to earn a living) but he said that it does not matter to dogs as they normally sleep more than they are awake.  His dogs (he has 13) are alone or crated (depending on their temperatement - they are all rescued dogs) for long period during the day. He brings about 6 of them daily at the training school.  If we wanted results we had to stop thinking "human" and put ourselves in a dog thinking way!  Wow!!! Not easy but do-able.

In order to solve her "problems" (chewing everything, extreme barking, running after my 3 cats) we need to work on her training a max of 2 hours per day (15 min. max per period).  He said that with consistency, we should get there in approximately 6 months from now. For humans, it seems harsh but to a dog it is not.

When we can't keep an eye on her perfectly, she must go back to her crate (I did not like this idea but then again he explained a lot of things that made sense too).  Since the door to her crate is always open when we are around, she even goes in it by herself. It forces her to calm down as well when things get to crazy.

But the funny thing is he just says "no" to her 4-5 times during a session and she listens to him perfectly.  We try the same thing at home and it's unbelievable how we have problems doing it as he does.  He said to be patient and practice, practice, practice.....

But all in all she is improving and we do enjoy having her around.  She makes us laugh and forces us to work out more!!!!

Well this is it for now and I will keep you posted on her improvements.
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« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2003, 09:44:03 AM »

I was wondering what the homeopathic treatment was that he put your dog on.  My trainer recommended a treatment called rescue remedy.  Lola gets extremely nervous when she goes to the vet that she shakes really bad.  I give her the rescue remedy about a 1/2 hour before we go and the difference was amazing.  She was calmer and she could actually enjoy the other dogs in the waiting room etc.  It's all natual and you can get it at a health food store.  I don't use it every day just when I know it's going to be stressful time for her.  I'm glad that you feel more positive about your dogs training.  It does take time and you are right that they need to know who the alpha dog is.  Good Luck and keep us posted. Smile
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Lola, 6 years old Born 5/30/02
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« Reply #11 on: November 04, 2003, 10:07:09 AM »

Marie,

Thanks for your reply.

I will let you know tonight as I am at work right now and don't know the names by heart.  I'm pretty sure one bottle is Phosphorus - 9 CH. The other one is a 2 word name that I can't remember (they really have weird names sometimes).  She has 5 granules of each morning and night.  The treatment costs approximately $16 Cdn per 8 days.

By the way what is exactly the name of rescue remedy you give your dog.  If these pills don't work maybe it could also be an alternative.  Who knows.....

Thanks.
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« Reply #12 on: November 04, 2003, 05:51:38 PM »

Rescue Remedy is a natural stress reliever made by Bach.  It is made with flower essences and you can find it in any health food store. It's made from Cherry plum, clematis, Impatiens, rock rose and star of Bethlehem. You can also find it on the internet if you would like other opinions on it.  I have heard that some show dogs use it before they go in the ring.  It is in liquid form so it is easier to give your dog than pills.  You give them 4-5 drops  and it is safe to use every day.  

Thanks for the info. Smile
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Lola, 6 years old Born 5/30/02
Standard Eskie, 32lbs Happy
Cats: Sandi and Buddy & Bootz 



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« Reply #13 on: November 04, 2003, 08:40:59 PM »

Nuuk,

Sounds like you are starting to get a handle on it... only time and some good fun training need to play out now.  Just always remember to keep it fun for both of you and it won't really seem that Harsh (time will just fly by).

Training never really stops, but with time it will be second nature and the time involved will become less and less, as you both learn what to expect from each other.   But, one thing about Eskies, they will always test you.  You'll find that their little brains are always working overtime and you'll wonder sometimes who is the trainer and who is the trainee.

Good Luck and please do keep us all posted!
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« Reply #14 on: November 05, 2003, 03:23:30 AM »

To Nuuk, and everyone who's participated in this thread: Keep up the good discussion, updates, etc.! This has been a super topic and lots of good points all around!

I'm glad to hear your eskie is doing better, Nuuk.....and that you're all working out the details of the relationship. One thing I've found is that almost no matter what dog you bring into the family, they bring their own personality and issues with them....some good, some not, but in th end, it's mostly a matter of working the relationship out so it's good for everyone. With dogs, the issue of leadership, obedience, etc. are all important and it's so nice to see this issue unfolding for the better for all of you.

Compliments to you on your positive work/results, and for all the details! Keep up the good work! DO keep us updated.....

Take care....
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« Reply #15 on: November 05, 2003, 10:45:00 AM »

Boy, is Michael ever right about each dog bringing its own personality and issues.  My two are from the same breeder, same "daddy", nearly the same age but they have many personality differences.

Kola just wants to hang with us, be where we are, doing whatever we are doing.  Shasta wants something to be happening all the time.  Kola sits and watches me sort the laundry--Shasta steals the socks.  Kola takes a nap while I take a shower--Shasta takes the end of the toilet paper and runs into the living room with it.  If Kola won't play with her and just sits there, Shasta takes his tail in her mouth and tries to drag him across the floor.

So, while I'm trying to teach Shasta to just chill out sometimes, it's not realistic to expect her to lay around the house and leave me alone.  I have to provide her with things to do (she loves the Buster cube) or send her outside in our fenced yard to play with Kola.  This is also helpful as it is preventing Kola from becoming a complete couch potato!

As someone else pointed out, Eskies like to use their brains so we can never completely let our guard down.  But that's what makes them so lovable.
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« Reply #16 on: November 05, 2003, 11:50:22 AM »

Thanks all for your support.  It really pays off for the dog and us.

I just ordered through my vet the famous Mini Buster Cube I read everywhere on this site.

I should receive it next week at the latest.  My dog already has 2 Kong toys (the black and the red) and goes nuts with both of them (full or empty)  In fact, she goes nuts on anything!!!!! LOL.  Can't wait to see her try to empty this one too.

I can't believe how we are going over-board with all these toys...... I am sure I never had so much toys at once in my entire childhood life than
she's had in 5 months. LOL

I will let you know how she is doing with this new toy!
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« Reply #17 on: November 13, 2003, 11:59:14 AM »

Hello

As promised, here is an update about my dog.

Ireceived the new buster cube Monday and she is really going at it since then.  It keeps her busy for 15-20 minutes and then she's off to something else and comes back to the cube.  Can't believe how much food you can put in there.  My budget will be busted in no time (just kidding).

I wished that the cube would be rubber as I have wood floor and ceramic tiles and it is very noisy :-)))).  But.... it's fun to see her work at it.  My cats' ears are backward with the noise on the floor :-))))

Homeopathic treatment is still being given but results are not showing too much yet.  Still a few more days on it and we will see.  She is so hyper that her system might be fighting it off....

It is suppose to snow here tonight and if it does, it will be her first snow outing.  Can't wait to see her reaction with the snow flakes.

For the rest it is still the same.

I will keep in touch and take care!

Nuuk
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« Reply #18 on: November 13, 2003, 05:33:53 PM »

Hi Nuuk,  Glad to hear you are still hanging in there.   Snow is great, though you'll be shocked, just how "not White" your Eskie is.   My Winston is as white as they come, but next to snow...he looks yellow... it's funny!

Winston loves the snow... On a nice clear snow day, he'll stay out for hours just playing and having a great time.  He'll bite, dig, roll, make snow puppies and just lay in it.  I have a difficult time getting him to come in.  On days that he is out and it is actually snowing, it's really funny!  He'll come back in looking like a big giant snow flake... he'll be cover in snow (it sticks great to the fur)... so have a towel handy.

Word of advise (though you probably already know)..  make sure you keep the salt and melting products out of your puppies paws... just make sure it's all toweled off when you are done with the walk and none get stuck between the pads/toes... it can become very painful for puppy.

Have Fun!
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« Reply #19 on: November 13, 2003, 10:52:15 PM »

Hi Eskiagilitypal and thanks for replying.

Can't wait to get some snow but I guess it will have to wait as it stopped raining and forecast has changed. No snow is now forecasted for the next week or so.  Cute pictures will have to wait but we will be getting more than enough snow to get us praying for summer to come back LOL.

Everyone keep saying being this white she will get lost in snowbanks, in the backyard, etc.....  So funny.... Especially that no one around here has seen this breed before.  In my province we only found so far 2 breeders (beside the puppy mills that surely must exist unfortunately and that we don't know about).  Even my vet who has been practicing for over 10 years has seen only a handful of this breed.  Everybody thinks she is a "white" pomeranian. I can't believe by doing internet searches how many rescue places exist for this breed around the world while here the breed is basically unknown.

As far as she is whenever we go out with her (which is almost all the time), she behaves just like a sweetheart and we only get good comments.  When I tell them how she really is hyperactive, barking, etc. and that we are working closely with a trainer to help us out it's funny how they change their minds.

I live in a small city that uses on 10% salt and the rest is a mixture of sand/gravel.  Not good for car windshield but that could be another topic!!!!

As for us we only use natural de-icer because of our pet, lawn and inside flooring.  So this is not going to be a big issue for our baby.

I was thinking of buying her little winter boots in order to avoid freezing paws and wonder if anyone tried that before.  We have a little top coat for her for rainy days and it is not easy to have her keep it on.  Can't imagine putting the boots on her!!!! She is a terrible teenager always trying to argue LOL

Talk to you later!
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« Reply #20 on: November 14, 2003, 12:16:03 AM »

Nuuk,  In-line skates...now boots! What a little fashion statement!!!!!  Makes me want to humm "These Boots are Made for Walkin"   LOL!!!!  

I have only seen two dogs wearing boots, since I have moved to the Cincy area, so I don't have any real knowledge of how easy or not.. it is to train them to wear them.  They did not seem to mind them and got around very well with them.    

I know freezing paws are of concern for some breeds, but you'll probably find that it won't bug your little girl at all.  Eskies are built for winter (double coat, nice hair between the toe pads, etc) and have no problems with the cold or walking in the snow and ice.  I have had Winston now through two winters (going on the third) and I have had no problems with freezing paws. We walk three miles daily, regardless of weather conditions (unless severe) and no problems.

But... every dog is different and has different limits... so just keep a eye on her and as long as she is walking fine and her pads are not cracking... you have no reason to worry.  


Nuuk...don't think I'm makin' fun about the boots... I'm the crazy lady who dressed Winston up as Superman for a Halloween party at our local dog club..... my child!
Only to get beat in the costume contest by a 150# Alaskan Malumute dressed as a Green Monster..Imagine!
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« Reply #21 on: November 14, 2003, 03:45:52 AM »

Quote
Originally posted by Nuuk

I was thinking of buying her little winter boots in order to avoid freezing paws and wonder if anyone tried that before.  We have a little top coat for her for rainy days and it is not easy to have her keep it on.  Can't imagine putting the boots on her!!!! She is a terrible teenager always trying to argue LOL



Yep, not only have we used booties here, I also make them, so if you're interested in some, drop me a note and I'm sure we could work something out. My main format, and ones I've made for Shelby are polar-fleece on the inside and Ultrex(same thing as Gore-tex) on the outside with elastic/velcro fasteners. The fleece is for nice soft and warm on the inside and the Ultrex is a water-proof fabric(amazing fabric really!), so combined they can keep out the wet/cold and keep the warm/soft inside! Smile Talk about spoiled doggie feets, eh! Smile I can make other variations as well, but that's my preferred style. I can also add a grippy footing on the sole area, so it's even got traction/more protection! Smile The ones Shelby's used have worked well for her. We get into a little routine before going outside to put them on. Then a quick routine on coming back in to take them off. Only takes a minute to put them on.....and less time to take off. Just do one foot at a time...times 4, of course!

What I found interesting is that my poodle(Jamie)'s feet were wider and actually tended to be "tougher" in the pads than Shelby's are. Though, I do have to admit, Shelby is a very spoiled house dog, so maybe her pads/feet are more tender than other eskies. But, anyway....Jamie could stand the cold/snow without the booties on longer than Shelby could. Shelby wanted to come in RIGHT AWAY after doing her thing, but Jamie was ok longer. So, I made sure to have Shelby wear the booties in any cold weather(already has worn them a couple days this month already!) Overall, I not only find them helpful, with Shelby they are practially necessary in the coldest of winter.

I will add that you won't worry about losing your eskie in the snow....it "is" interesting to see how "not so snow white" they really are when compared to the snow. No biggie, really, but is an eye opener to some degree.

Anyway....if you're interested in trying booties out, feel free to drop me a note and I'm sure we can work something out.

Take care....
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« Reply #22 on: November 14, 2003, 09:32:49 AM »

Hello again.

Thanks Michael for the boot offer it was really nice of you.  I will wait and see how she does in the first snow before doing a move.  I looked in petshops around my place and could not find anything decent or made to attach easily to her ankles.  Beside, living in Quebec will make it more difficult and costly with customs and all(altough not that much since the prices are not that high for such an item) to purchase these boots from the States.

Eskiagilitygal,
Yes in-lines, booties and you would not believe us but we purchased at the end of September a pet trailer so she can join us during our bicycle rides.  So far we only used it once and she did not like it.  My husband was the one with the trailer and I would have to stay right behind or beside her otherwise she would be barking or crying.  Poor baby, panick settled in when she could not see me nearby.  We'lle have to wait in the spring as the weather is now to cold for bikes to get her used to this activity.

I am looking into purchasing a special adaptor to put on the bike bar which would allow the dog to run beside us without the danger of running too far or to close from the bike.  But I want her to get use to the trailer before.  Otherwise it will be money spent for nothing.

I kept saying to my husband that if the dog did not improve on the issues that we had (cat chasing, hyperactivity, barking, etc.) that she would have to go (but he knows me soooo well that it will never happened as we are working hard with her).  When a pet comes in my home, it only leaves because it passed away due to illnesses or old age..... then again we cry for days if not for months.  This dog has soooooo much toys it would be unbelievable and she has only been with us since July 2003.  She is very spoiled.  Maybe too much.  If it was only up to my heart, I would go and get another one (did I say trouble here!!!) to keep her company but I feel that with 3 cats and her my house is full.  Even though I have a huge house and a big backyard.  Let say that she is already a hand-full if not 2.

Gotta to go.  Talk to you later and thanks for your funny comments.  It makes my day just to read you and try to imagine pictures of dogs on in-lines, etc.
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« Reply #23 on: August 18, 2010, 04:37:02 PM »

I'm re-reading some old posts of mine (that's what happens on vacation with too much time on my hands and 2 dogs too tired to do anything).

oh!My time flies....and I'm crazy since then I got another dog, a 3rd one on the way and a third cat. We're nuts. Big Grin
« Last Edit: August 18, 2010, 04:40:09 PM by Saint Mom » Logged

Helene-Saint mom
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