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Author Topic: What's everyone's views  (Read 3667 times)
Anniejack
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« on: December 06, 2002, 09:59:16 PM »

How does everyone feel about breeding?

I feel that breeding should only (I stress, ONLY) be done for the betterment of the breed, under very strict rules and regulations.

That's just me.   Cool
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Mom to Diego, 5 year old Male Mini Eskie, 19 pounds.
Michael
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« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2002, 10:19:09 PM »

Well, I can only speak for me, but I really feel that breeding "any" breed should be only taken on if a person is truly devoted to doing their very best, and aim to bring out "quality" dogs from the breeding(s). I have worked with breeders, and known many, and ones that truly care, are amazing, and an absolute inspiration.

I got my Jamie from the lady who bred her, and I worked for her as well. I got to know "many" of the dogs from those lines, and the temperament and longevity/health was impressive. I would have "never" thought a poodle would be a neat dog, but Jamie is just incredible. She is the most special dog I've really ever known.

When I decided to get an Eskie, I knew I was going to look for a decent breeder as well, and feel I found one that lives up to that. I can't say enough about how wonderful I think my Shelby is, and the lines she comes from are wonderful dogs as well.

I have seen good and bad in various breeders, and my bottom line is the people need to put their beliefs and philosophies at the foundation of their breedings. They WILL come to be tested. If those foundations are indeed for improving the breed, or just bringing out the "best" of it, then they're on the right track. If they're only interested in puppies for sale, notoriety in a show ring, or anything for "their own interest" then it usually is a very poor foundation. I can't say their is a litmus test to say someone is a good breeder or not, but I feel that "good" breeders are an absolute inspiration to whatever breed they devote themselves too.

Just my two pennies offhand......
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Michael

Shelby- American Eskimo Dog
Dahlia & Cassandra - Miniature Poodles
In loving memory of Jamie and Amber (Miniature Poodles)
Anniejack
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« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2002, 11:17:18 AM »

Nicely said, Michael.  Smile

BTW, I co-own a poodle with my Ex.  I rarely get to see Gunner anymore, but he is truly an awsome dog.  Poodles are very intellegent, devoted, patient, loving dogs.
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Mom to Diego, 5 year old Male Mini Eskie, 19 pounds.
eskiemom
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« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2003, 12:50:40 PM »

I am new to this message board and relatively new to showing and breeding Eskies, but I have grown up with dogs all my life and I love them more than most people! I vehemently agree with both of you that breeding should only be done for the betterment of the breed and never to make money. For one thing you don't really make that much money as a breeder when you take all things under consideration (expenses for shots, food, etc) It is a lot of very hard work (if you got paid by the hour- it would  be way less than minimum wage!) and requires a great deal of emotional commitment and discipline (it is REALLY hard to let the puppies go!).  What Michael said about being philosophically behind your breed is also very true- a successful breeder is one who is willing to spend money to add value to the breed- not to spend dogs to add money to his pocket book. It's all about motivation.
It's also about LOVE- because that is your greatest reward. I have 4 Eskies and I am amazed at how much I love them and they love me! They will do anything to please me. Sometimes when they are in the ring and working so hard to win just because they know how happy it makes me, it brings tears of joy to my eyes. Their love is so unconditional. I firmly believe that kind of unconditional love must be the number one driving force in a breeder.
That's my opinion and I am sticking to it!  Smile
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maremar
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« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2003, 04:45:51 PM »

Interesting topic.  I suspect many of us have the same thoughts as Annie, Michael and Eskiemom (Stacy - is that you??).  

I had a very rewarding conversation just today with a woman who I sold one of my pups to.  She is considering to breed her pup and she's doing it (IMO) the right way!  She's asking my help/advice as her mentor/her bitches breeder/and her friend in IF, how and what to do.  We talked for over an hour just on genetics, temperament, health testing and I'm sure that is just the beginning of many phone calls.  

I've gotten a lot of support/assistance from other Eskie breeders/people and all of that is so helpful.  It is so very important to pass 'it' on.  That is another one of the important aspects of being a breeder.
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Mary V. - St. Paul MN  
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fennie
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« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2003, 03:31:22 PM »

hi
i would like some advice on breeding. i own a eskie who just came into season few days ago. she is almost 1yrs old. i always own dogs, male dogs especially, since my parents always told me it's better to handle a male dog so you won't end up taking care of the pups if it was a female dog.  this is my first time to own an eskie and i love her. i would like make her a breeding dog but don't know how to go about it.  any suggestions or info?
thanks
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Michael
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« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2003, 09:39:47 PM »

Fennie:

Not sure where you got your eskie, but if you got her from a breeder, that is the FIRST person to talk to. Since they are already a breeder, they can give you insight into the many aspects of breeding/raising dogs. Beware.....if you are REALLY intent on doing a quality job, there's a LOT more involved than just a boy and a girl dog!

If you did not get your eskie from a breeder, FIND ONE. Find a local eskie breeder...ideally a GOOD eskie breeder. Search around...go to shows if you can, etc. Call vets, groomers, etc. Big thing here is to develop a dialog with an eskie breeder you like locally. They will be able to give you the best local advice.

Again, more to beware...if you did NOT get your eskie from a breeder, chances are it is not necessarily from the best "stock" or parentage, meaning the conformation, etc. may be lacking in some respects. It does NOT mean your eskie is any lesser, just might not be "best of breed" type quality. Good breeders can spot quality and lack thereof readily. Have an OPEN mind.....you may well be told just to keep your girl as a pet and look for a "show quality" dog if you're planning on breeding. Don't take it personally...."pets" and "show dogs" come from the same litters usually, just be open to that perspective. If they're a good breeder, they'll be honest with you. If your girl is a star, they'll be impressed too. So, take any advice there well, but the decision is still yours.

Another reason to look for an eskie breeder is they are more likely to have male studs(or know who has a good one). You don't just want the neighbor's dog to be sire.....or any other "first one that comes along" types. Also, a breeder will help you in that aspect if you go that route. Overall, a good eskie breeder will be a good shoulder to lean on and learn from....that is key to doing the best!

Also, it's a good idea to talk to your vet about this too....if there are ANY health issues he/she is aware of with your dog that might complicate breeding/pregnancy, etc. he/she'll be able to help you  understand better. Or even just to know of all the issues you'll want to know before getting into it.

Overall, my advice is to learn what you can FIRST. Whether an eskie breeder, vet, and/or other breeders.....learn all you can. If you plan to breed your girl, keep her intact for now, but keep her protected from any "boyfriends" as well. Only when you are 100% ready to seriously breed should you go forward with it, and knowing what all is involved from pre-conception to placing the puppies in homes is a LOT of stuff really, and is better to know than not. So, learn what you can first....and only then consider breeding.

Take care....
« Last Edit: June 04, 2003, 07:01:32 PM by Michael » Logged

Michael

Shelby- American Eskimo Dog
Dahlia & Cassandra - Miniature Poodles
In loving memory of Jamie and Amber (Miniature Poodles)
EskieMa
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« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2003, 10:43:30 PM »

Most breeders wait until their eskie is at least 2 years old before breeding.  And then it is even longer as the hip cleareance can't even be done til after 24 months.

Besides that eskies are a slow maturing breed, not attaining full physical growth until after 2 years, and you don't want to know how long it takes them to mature mentally. So let your year old girl be just what she is - a puppy!      Mary
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Mary in the Northern Neck of VA


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DonnaG
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« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2003, 05:28:51 PM »

Good point Michael.  I would like to add that our eskie is a non show dog of unknown heritage, and indeed fixed.  We love her and she is a beautiful eskie, but I have done a lot of research since we got her from the rescue and have found out a few things.  
1) There are a lot of dogs out there who need homes.  There are mutts and purebreds, many lovely dogs!
2) Dogs bred without the benefit of the purest parents will be more likely to develop problems, be it physical or behaviorial.  

I would recommend leaving the breeding and puppies to the serious breeders.  As I can tell from previous posts on this subject, it is alot of work and not and extremely lucrative business.  One must do it out of love and devotion to the breed.  It might sound like fun having 3 or 4 little balls of white bouncing around your house, but think about all the puppies in the kennels who are already here and need homes.  

Good luck with your decision.
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Donna G
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